Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Anonymous asked: After "Don't rape" and "Don't threaten rape" what's the best way for men to improve the lives of women and girls in geekdom?

postcardsfromspace:

Okay, look: “Don’t rape” and “don’t threaten rape” are pinpoint-specific parts of social compact, also known as “the bare minimum expectations for getting to be part of society.”

These are things that should be taken as a given. Don’t hold up ”don’t rape” and “don’t threaten rape” like they are gifts.

I mean, don’t do those things, and deter others from doing them, and talk about all of this, but, fuck, man.

Anyway.

The best way men can improve the lives of women and girls in geekdom is to do their damnedest to shift the balance of power. Geek dudes—especially white geek dudes—you have something the ladies do not: you have a platform from which to speak about issues of justice with relative impunity. Use it. Better yet, share it with or give it to someone who does not have that privilege.

Are you a pro on a panel that’s all white dudes? Give up your seat to a woman of color. Encourage other panelists to do the same. Straight-up refuse to be part of panels that do not work toward equal representation. Hold speaker and guest lists at cons to the same standard. And talk about what you are doing, and why.

If you are in a position that gives you hiring power, hire women—especially into positions where they will have power, not just low-level editorial and work-for-hire gigs. Actively seek and use the input of women, and go out of your way to make really damn sure they’re credited for those contributions

Seek and vocally advocate for works by and about women, for female-friendly and generally diversity-friendly publishers, retailers, and fan communities. When someone does shit right, vote with your dollars and spread the word. When someone fucks up, call them out, and—if there’s any real potential for it and you’ve got the capacity—offer them impetus for and tools to change.

Buy girl books. Buy books with pink covers, and read them in public. Break down the box of geek masculinity, and live the geek culture you want to see and be part of. Subvert everything.

Meanwhile: Hold other men accountable. Don’t tell rape jokes. Call out bullshit.

And respect the anger of those of us who have been consistently marginalized. If you want to be an ally in this fight, recognize that the fight is not about you: sometimes solidarity means giving other people space to be frustrated and angry at a system from which you directly benefit, and sometimes that means that they will, by extension, be angry at you—and that this, along with everything else, means *that system* is your common enemy.

Speaking of systems: Educate yourself. Read How to Suppress Women’s Writing and call that shit out. Understand that in this fight, your voice is generally considered to mean more than mine. Fight that inequality as hard as you can—but meanwhile, while you’ve got that platform, use it.

pkpow:

sirtarantino:

a guy walked into the board room and said

"hi sweetheart if you could fix me up a coffee real quick im meeting with the regional reports manager in like five minutes, thanks darling"

and i just stared at him and coldly said

"i am the regional reports manager"

we are now twenty minutes into this board meeting and i dont think i’ve ever seen a man look so embarrassed and afraid in my whole life

Always reblog

(Source: sofiajonze)

Monday, April 14, 2014

rubberbandgirlme:

if cap3 isn’t called “captain america and falcon: we’re up all night to get bucky”, i’m not watching it

pkpow:

msjayjustice:

timetravelandrocketpoweredapes:

Super cosplayer Jay Justice

Cosplayer deviantart / facebook / tumblr

I didn’t post this, but thanks to OP for crediting me! And wow at all the comments & tags! Most of them had me cracking up but this one was not so good:
"you can really overlook skin color on how f*cking fantastic the cosplay is"

Skin color is not something negative you have to overlook to appreciate the ‘rest of’ the person you are looking at. It is not a flaw that you have to ignore in order to admire someone’s work. The person who said this was not complimenting me but exposing their own racial bias.

My skin color is not something ‘wrong’ with my costumes. Being a black woman enhances my costumes. Black women are the beautiful flowers that white supremacy tried to kill but we kept growing anyway. They try to tell us we’re ugly and dirty and sadly some of us start to believe it. They sell us skin bleach & hair straighteners, and white wash our characters and expect us to be complacent. When we speak out we’re told we’re too loud and angry and unfeminine.

I appreciate all the kind words on this post but I want to say that it’s not a compliment to express approval of someone ‘in spite of’ that person’s race. If you can’t appreciate my work without a negative remark about my skin color, the problem most certainly is not with me but within you.

Skin color is not something negative you have to overlook to appreciate the ‘rest of’ the person you are looking at. 

People don’t like her because it’s the making of her, right now. When she, sometime soon in the future, becomes this person that she’s been kind of building up to, for the past three seasons, now four, then people will really begin to root for her. I think even the audience doesn’t realize she’s such a dark horse. If she acted badass and tried to kill everyone there, she would be dead by now! She’s so intelligent, and I can’t stress that enough. Courtesy is a lady’s armor. She’s using her courtesy to deceive people, and she’s using her former self as a facade, and it works so much to her advantage, because people still think she’s this naive, vulnerable, little girl, and she’s really not. She knows exactly what she’s doing. She knows what game she’s playing! And no one else does. And she’s learned from the best — Cersei, Margaery, Tyrion, Littlefinger, even Joffrey. She’s learned so much from these people, and they don’t even realize it. They’re unwittingly feeding her to become this great kind of manipulator. King’s Landing can either make or break a person, and in Sansa’s case, it’s making her. Sophie Turner, in response to Sansa hate (x)

(Source: beyonslays)

tastefullyoffensive:

[via]
apollofastingdionysusdrunk:

jakefromstate-farm:

i didnt think this was even possible

how

Physics.

apollofastingdionysusdrunk:

jakefromstate-farm:

i didnt think this was even possible

how

Physics.

callioope:

Brienne represents everything that Cersei wants, but can’t have.

She is a woman who successfully broke gender traditions, evidenced by the sword she carries.

She’s independent and more in control of her own life than even the Queen.

Despite her warrior nature, she’s retained a very innocent (arguably naive) view of the world. Contrast that with Cersei’s jaded outlook and paranoid scheming.

She is the perfect foil to Cersei.

Everything about Nine was great

isashi-nigami:

Everything he said was pure gold

image

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And not just the funny and sass…

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Literally everything

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Even when he don’t say anything, tho

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I love how he was always smiling

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Even tought he was the most damaged Doctor

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The way he looked at Rose

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GOD, THEY WERE SO CUTE

image hells yeah

Nine

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I want him back

(Source: loki-no-cha-da-tardis)